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PTFE Rods, Bushes, Sheets, Machined Components

Super Industrial Lining Private Limited Manufactures Below Products

  • PTFE Moulded Rods
  • PTFE Moulded Bushes
  • PTFE Moulded Sheets
  • PTFE Skived Sheets
  • PTFE Machined Components like Gaskets and Valve Components

Mechanical Properties of PTFE

Deformation under Load (Creep) & Cold Flow

This property is an important consideration in the design of parts from polytetrafluoroethylene. PTFE deforms substantially over time when it is subjected to load. Metals similarly deform at elevated temperatures. Creep is defined as the total deformation under stress after a period of time, beyond the instantaneous deformation upon load application. Significant variables that affect creep are load, time under load, & temperature.

Resin manufacturers have long recognized the excessive deformation of polytetrafluoroethylene in applications where parts such as gaskets & seals experience high pressures. Copolymers of tetraethylene with small amounts of other fluorinated monomer are known as Modified PTFE resins & have been reported to exhibit reduced deformation under load.

Fatigue Properties

Flexibility characteristics are of paramount importance in many applications involving motion. A valve diaphragm is a good example of a part where a polymer membrane experiences repeated movement. Flex life is defined as the number of cycles that a part can endure before catastrophic fatigue occurs; the higher the molecular weight, the higher the flex life. Crystallinity has a detrimental effect on flex life; the higher the crystallinity, the lower the flex life.

Impact Strength

Impact strength of a part depends on its ability to develop an internal force multiplied by the deformation of the part as a result of impact. The shape of a part, such as a metal spring as opposed to a flat metal plate, can Enhance its ability to absorb impact PTFE resins have excellent impact strength in a broad temperature range.

Hardness

Hardness of PTFE is determined by a number of methods, such as ASTM D758 or D2240 (Rockwell R Scale), or by Durameter scales.

Fillers improve the hardness of PTFE by 10% - 15%, which is preserved over a wide range of temperatures. Increasing the filler content, in general, elevates the hardness of the compound.

Abrasion and Wear

Polytetrafluoroetylene parts have good wear properties. The resistance of unfilled PTFE to wear is less than that of filled compositions.

Electrical Properties

Electrical stability of polytetrafluoroethylene is outstanding over a wide range of frequency and environmental conditions. This plastic makes an excellent electrical insulator at normal operating temperatures. Dissipation factor and virtually constant up to 10 MHz Dielectric strength of PTFE drops off with increasing frequency slower than most other material.

Thermal Behavior of PTFE

Polytetrafluoroethylene resins are very stable their normal use temperature range (< 260 0C). They exhibit a small degree of degradation at higher temperatures.

Thermal Expansion

A polytetrafluoroethylene part contracts 2% when it is cooled from 23 0C to -196 0C & expand 4% upon heating from 23 0C to 249 0C. These dimensional charges are significant to the design, fabrication, & use of PTFE parts.

Thermal Conductivity & Heat Capacity

Polytetrafluoroethylene resins have very low thermal conductivity & are considered good insulators.

Irradiation Resistance of PTFE

Polytetrafluoroethylene & other perfluorinated fluoropolymers are quite susceptible to radiation. Exposure to high energy radiation such as X-rays, gamma rays, & electron beams, degrades PTFE by breaking down the molecules & reducing its molecular weight. As in thermal degradation, radiation stability of PTFE is much better under vacuum compared to air.

Typical Properties of Filled Fluoro polymers

Mechanical Properties

Polytetrafluoroethylene retains excellent properties at very low and high temperatures.

Table 3.11 provides summery of some of the mechanical properties of three different compound containing 65% bronze, 15% carbon, & 25% glass fiber at different temperatures. Properties of unfilled PTFE have been listed for comparison.

Tensile strength and break elongation at elevated temperatures are given in Table 3.12. All the listed compounds retain excellent tensile properties at above room temperature.

Deformation under load of all filled polytetraflouroethylene compounds decreases in comparison to unfilled resin, as seen in Table 3.13.

Combinations of carbon & graphite reduce deformation under load is bronze at 60% by weight. Hardness is increased by the addition of additives, particularly bronze, carbon & graphite Table 3.14.

Compressive strength & flexural data are presented in Table 3.15. & Table 3.16.

Thermal Properties

Fillers reduce the liner coefficient of thermal expansion & contraction of compounds. Table 3.17 & Table 3.18 provide data for several compounds at different temperatures. Aluminum reduces the coefficient of thermal contraction the most due to its flat platelet structure; mica has a similar effect.

Electrical Properties

Fillers & additives significantly increase the porosity of polytetrafluoroethylene compounds. Electrical properties are affected by the void content as well as the filler characteristics. Dielectric strength drops while dielectric constant & dissipation factor rise. Metals, carbon & graphite increase the thermal conductivity of PTFE compounds. Table 3.19 & Table 3.20 present electrical properties of a few common compounds.

Chemical Property

Permeability of compound increase due to the voids. Polytetrafluoroethylene has excellent chemical resistance properties. The effect of incorporation of additives on chemical properties depends on the type of the filler & the specific chemicals. In general, chemical properties of filled PTFE compounds are not as good as those of the unfilled resin. Table 3.21 shows the effect of a number of chemicals on carbon/graphite, glass & bronze compound.

PTFE and PTFE Specifications:

PTFE Sheet and Film
ASTM D 3293. Describes the properties and characteristics parameters for PTFE molded sheets (thicker than .250 inches).

PTFE Rod
ASTM 1710-08. Describes the properties and characteristics parameters for different grades of PTFE extruded and molded rod and for heavy-walled tubing.

PTFE Molded Sheet or Shapes
ASTM D 3294. Describes the properties and characteristics parameters for molded PTFE shapes and molded PTFE sheets.

PTFE Skived Tape
ASTM D 3308. Describes the properties and characteristics parameters for skived tape (.250 inches and thinner)

Filled Compounds made With PTFE
ASTM D 4745. Describes the properties and characteristics parameters for filled molding compounds made with PTFE. The specification provides standards for bulk density, tensile strength and elongation of PTFE filled with different percentages of glass fiber, glass fiber and Molybdenum Disulfide, graphite, carbon and graphite, bronze, bronze and Molybdenum Disulfide and stainless steel.

PTFE Tubing
ASTM D 1710-08. The tubing is intended for electrical, mechanical, chemical and medical applications manufactured from extrusion resins made from PTFE resins.

Molding and Machining Tolerances for PTFE resin parts
ASTM 3297. This specification defines tolerances applicable to parts molded and free sintered from PTFE resins and to machine parts produced from basic shapes of compression molded or ram extruded resins. The thermal expansion of PTFE parts between 64F and 70F is non-uniform due to a critical transition zone characteristic of PTFE resins.

Standard grades of material of composition:

  • Virgin PTFE
  • Chemically Modified Virgin PTFE
  • 15%-25% Glass Filled PTFE
  • 5% / 15% Glass + 5% MOS2 Filled PTFE
  • 25-30% Carbon Filled PTFE
  • 15% Graphite Filled
  • 40-60% Bronze Filled PTFE
  • 55 % Bronze + 5 % MOS2 FILLED PTFE

Properties of Filled PTFE Compounds

Unfilled Polytetraflouroethylene is inadequate for number of mechanically demanding engineering applications. Cold Flow or creep would prevent the use of PTFE in Many mechanical Applications. Creep is defined as total deformation under stress after a period of time. Significant Variables that affect creep are load, time under load, and temperature.

Advantages of fillers have been found to improve a number of physical properties of PTFE, Particularly Creep and Wear rate.

Filled Granular Resins are found to be suitable for Gaskets, Shaft Seals, Bearing, and Bearing Pads.

The choice and concentration of the filler depends on the desired properties of the final part. Glass Fiber, Bronze, Steel, Carbon, Carbon Fiber and graphite are among the common fillers materials.

Upto 40% by volume of filler can be added to the resin without complete loss of the physical properties. The Impact of the additives 5% below of filler on the properties of compound is insignificant. Above 40% most physical properties of the compounds drop sharply.

The only requirement for an additive to qualify as filler for PTFE is that it should be able to withstand the sintering temperature temperatures of PTFE. Sintering Involves exposure to temperature close to 400 Degree Celcius. Characteristics of the fillers such as particle size and shape affect the properties of the compound.

Glass Fiber is the most common Filler with a positive impact on the creep performance of PTFE by reducing it at low and high temperatures. Wear characteristics of polytetraflouroethylene are improved. Glass has little impact on the electrical properties of PTFE. Dielectric Breakdown Strength is somewhat adversely affected due to the increased porosity of parts. One drawback to the glass is the discoloration of sintered parts, more prevalent at higher temperatures.

Carbon reduces creep, increases hardness and elevates thermal conductivity of polytertarafluoroethtylene. Wear resistance of the carbon filled components improves particularly when combined with graphite. Carbon filled Compounds performs well in non lubricated applications such as piston rings in compressor cylinders.

Carbon Fiber lowers creep, increases flex and compressive modulus and raises hardness. These changes can be achieved in glass but less carbon fiber can achieve the same effects. Coefficient of thermal expansion is lowered and thermal conductivity is higher for compounds of carbon fiber PTFE. Graphite filled polytetraflouroethylene has an extremely low coefficient of friction due to low friction chararacterics of graphite. Graphite is chemically inert. Graphite imparts excellent wear properties of PTFE.

Bronze is the most popular metallic fibre.Large Quantity of (40-60% of the Weight). Large quantities of bronze reduce deformation under load and raise thermal and electrical conductivity of PTFE Compounds. These two characteristics are beneficial to applications where a part is subjected to load at extreme temperatures. Bronze is an alloy of Copper and tin and is attacked by acids and bases. It is oxidized and discolored during the sintering cycle with no impact on quality.

Molybdenum disulphide is an interesting additive. It increases the hardness of the surface while decreasing friction. Electrical Properties of the compound are virtually unaffected. It is normally used in small proportions combined with other fillers such as glass.

Reinforced Gasketing Material

Reinforced fine powder polytetraflouoroethylene material is primarily used for application as gaskets and seals in extreme temperature, pressure and chemical environments.

A Gasket in this type of application must be resilient and resistant to corrosive chemicals and also maintain high temperature and pressure. PTFE has necessary corrosion resistance to the majority of the industrial chemicals up to its melting point (327 Degree Celsius), but in its neat form (without fillers or additives) form it is not satisfactory in many applications because of the high cold flow (creep) that is inherent to PTFE.

After a short while an unfilled PTFE Gasket will begin to creep under pressure extended by the bolt loads that squeeze the gasket between the flanges. The net result of cold flow is loss of gasket thickness and leaks. An increase in temperature both accelerates and increases the creep.

The reinforcement approach deals with the problem of cold flow by highly filling PTFE with variety of fillers. Fillers are Hard Material such as metal powders, ceramic, glass fiber, carbon and others.

Fabrication of the reinforced gasket material is accomplished by filling the fine powder PTFE using the somewhat unusual process which incorporates the fillers in the polymer structure. Typically the sheets of the material are made of gaskets which can be stamped.

Product Traceability, Inspection & Testing

Super Industrial Lining Private Limited is accredited to ISO 9001:2008.

Traceability

We have traceability maintained in our system right from the incoming material to the Finished Goods Material. We maintain data sheets of the material issued from the raw material inspection department which checks the material with our standard drawings of the product along with the material test certificate of the material. PTFE/PFA/FEP are procured from Dupont are material. Material is issued to the respective department for manufacturing and as the material passed through various departments like the traceability of the material is maintained in the standard data sheets. By maintaining the data sheets we are able to trace when the material was taken in process and under which person it was process when the material reaches the inspection department the material is checked as the inspection of ASTM F 1545. The material is punched as below:

The Products are Hard Punched on the Fix Flanges Describing the Companies Name-Month-Year-Serial No. which helps us to cross reference with the Individual Department Production Sheets Maintained from Material Issue to Final QC of the Product.

Inspection and Testing

PTFE Testing

PTFE Liners Samples are taken for Testing after each sintering. Test includes Visual, Dimensional, Specific Gravity and Tensile Test.

Permeation Information

Permeation can be defined as passage of gases and liquids through a second material such as solid. It is significant consideration in the selection of the plastic material for the construction of the chemical processing equipment because process fluids may travel across the thickness of the polymer by permeation. Permeated species in sufficient quantities could cause corrosion, contamination.

Permeation is molecular migration through microvoids either in the polymer (if the polymer is more or less porous) or between polymer molecules. In neither case is there an attack on the polymer. This action is strictly a physical phenomenon. However, permeation can be detrimental when a polymer is used to line piping or equipment. In lined equipment, permeation can result in:

  • Failure of the substrate from corrosive attack.
  • Bond failure and blistering, resulting from the accumulation of fluids at the bond when the substrate is less permeable than the liner or from corrosion/reaction products if the substrate is Attacked by the permeant loss of contents through substrate and liner as a result of the eventual failure of the substrate All polymers do not have the same rate of permeation. In fact, some polymers are not affected by permeation. The fluoro-polymers are particularly affected.

Some control can be exercised over permeation that is affected by :-

  • Temperature and pressure
  • The permeant concentration
  • The thickness of the polymer

Increasing the temperature will increase the permeation rate because the solubility of the permeant in the polymer will increase, and as the temperature rises, polymer chain movement is stimulated, permitting more permeant to diffuse among the chains more easily. The permeation rates of many gases increase linearly with the partial pressure gradient, and the same effect is experienced with the concentration of gradients of liquids. If the permeant is highly soluble in the polymer, the permeability increase may be nonlinear. The thickness will generally decrease permeation by the square of the thickness.

The density of the polymer as well as the thickness will have an effect on the permeation rate. The greater the density of the polymer, the fewer voids through which permeation can take place. A comparison of the density of sheets produced from different polymers does not provide an indication of the relative permeation rates. However, a comparison of the sheets' density produced from the same polymer will provide an indication of the relative permeation rates. The denser the sheet, the lower the permeation rate.

The thickness of the liner is a factor affecting permeation. For general corrosion resistance, thicknesses of 0.010–0.020 in. are usually satisfactory, depending on the combination of lining material and the specific corrodent. When mechanical factors such as thinning to cold flow, mechanical abuse, and permeation rates are a consideration, thicker linings may be required. Increasing a lining thickness will normally decrease permeation by the square of the thickness. Although this would appear to be the approach to follow to control permeation, there are some disadvantages. First, as thickness increases, the thermal stresses on the boundary increase that can result in bond failure. Temperature changes and large differences in coefficients of thermal expansion are the most common causes of bond failure. The plastic's thickness and modulus of elasticity are two of the factors that influence these stresses. Second, as the thickness of the lining increases, installation becomes more difficult with a resulting increase in labor costs. The rate of permeation is also affected by the temperature and the temperature gradient in the lining. Lowering these will reduce the rate of permeation. Lined vessels, such as storage tanks, that are used under ambient conditions provide the best service.

Other factors affecting permeation consist of these chemical and physiochemical properties :-

  • Ease of condensation of the permeant. Chemicals that readily condense will permeate at higher rates.
  • The higher the intermolecular chain forces (e.g., van der Waals hydrogen bonding) of the polymer, the lower the permeation rate.
  • The higher the level of crystallinity in the polymer, the lower the permeation rate.
  • The greater the degree of cross-linking within the polymer, the lower the permeation rate.
  • Chemical similarity between the polymer and permeant when the polymer and permeant both have similar functional groups, the permeation rate will increase.
  • The smaller the molecule of the permeant, the greater the permeation rate.

Chemical Resistance

PTFE Chemical Resistance Char

Solvent
Exposure Temp., C
Exposure Time
Weight Gain,%
Acetone
20
12 mo
0.3
50
12 mo
0.4
70
2 wk
0
Benzene
78
96 hr
0.5
100
8 hr
0.6
200
8 hr
1.0
Carbon Tetrachloride
25
12 mo
0.6
50
12 mo
1.6
70
2 wk
1.9
100
8 hr
2.5
200
8 hr
3.7
Ethanol (95%)
25
12 mo
0
50
12 mo
0
70
2 wk
0
100
8 hr
0.1
200
8 hr
0.3
Ethyl Acetate
25
12 mo
0.5
50
12 mo
0.7
70
2 wk
0.7
Toluene
25
12 mo
0.3
50
12 mo
0.6
70
2 wk
0.6

Reagent Exposure Temp., C Exposure Time Weight Gain,%
Hydrochloric Acid
10% 25 12 mo. 0
10% 50 12 mo. 0
10% 70 12 mo. 0
20% 100 8 hr 0
20% 200 8 hr 0
Nitric Acid
10% 25 12 mo. 0
10% 70 12 mo. 0.1
Sulfuric Acid
30% 25 12 mo. 0
30% 70 12 mo. 0
30% 100 8 hr 0
30% 200 8 hr 0.1
Sodium Hydroxide
10% 25 12 mo. 0
10% 70 12 mo. 0.1
50% 100 8 hr 0
50% 200 8 hr 0
Ammonium Hydroxide
10% 25 12 mo. 0
10% 70 12 mo. 0.1

Chemical Effect on PTFE Sample
Chloroform Wets, insoluble at boiling point
Ethylene Bromide 0.3%weight gain after 24 hr at 100 C
Fluorinated Hydrocarbons Wets, swelling occurs in boiling solvent
Fluoro-naphthalene Insoluble at boiling point, some swelling
Fluronitrobenzene Insoluble at boiling point, some swelling
Pentachlorobenzamide insoluble
Perfluoroxylene Insoluble at boiling point, slight swelling
Tetrabromoethane Insoluble at boiling point
Tetrachloroetylene Wets, some swelling after 2 hr at 120 C
Trichloroacetic Acid Insoluble at boiling point
Trichloroethylene Insoluble at boiling point after 1 hr

PFA Chemical Resistance Char

Reagent Exposure Temperature, C Tensile Strength Retained,% Elongation Retained % Weight Gain, %
Acids :-
Hydrochloric (conc.) 120 98 100 0
Sulfuric (conc.) 120 95 98 0
Hydrofluoric (60%) 23 99 99 0
Fuming Sulfuric 23 95 96 0
Oxidizing Acids :-
Aqua Regia 120 99 100 0
Chromic (50%) 120 93 97 0
Nitric (conc.) 120 95 98 0
Fuming Nitric 23 99 99 0
Bases :-
Ammonium Hydroxide (conc.) 66 98 100 0
Sodium Hydroxide (conc.) 120 93 99 0.4
Peroxide :-
Hydrogen Peroxide (30%) 23 93 95 0
Halogens :-
Bromine 23 99 100 0.5
Bromine 59 95 95 -
Chlorine 120 92 100 0.5
Metal Salt Solutions :-
Ferric Chloride 100 93 98 0
Zinc Chloride (25%) 100 96 100 0
Miscellaneous :-
Sulfuric Chloride 69 83 100 2.7
Chlorosulfonic Acid 151 91 100 0.7
Phosphoric Acid (conc.) 100 93 100 0

Reagent Exposure Temperature, C Tensile Strength Retained,% Elongation Retained % Weight Gain, %
Acids/Anhydrides :-
Glacial Acetic Acid 118 95 100 0.4
Acetic Anhydride 139 91 99 0.3
Trichloroacetic Acid 196 90 100 2.2
Hydrocarbons :-
Isooctane 99 94 100 0.7
Naphtha 100 91 100 0.5
Mineral Oil 180 87 95 0
Toluene 110 88 100 0.7
Aromatic :-
O-Cresol 191 92 96 0.2
Nitrobenzene 210 90 100 0.7
Alcohol :-
Benzyl Alcohol 205 93 99 0.3
Ether :-
Tetrehydrofuran 66 88 100 0.7
Amine :-
Aniline 185 94 100 0.3
n-Butylamine 78 86 97 0.4
Ethylenediamine 117 96 100 0.1
Aldehyde :-
Benzaldehyde 179 90 99 0.5
Ketone :-
Cyclohexanone 156 92 100 0.4
Methyl Ethyl Ketone 80 90 100 0.4
Acetophenone 202 90 100 0.6
Esters :-
Dimethylphthalate 220 98 100 0.3
n-Butylcetate 125 93 100 0.5
Tri-n-Butylphosphate 200 91 100 2.0
Chlorinated Solvents :-
Methylene Chliride 40 94 100 0.8
Perchloroethylene 121 86 100 2.0
Carbon 77 87 100 2.3
Tetrachloride
Polar Soivents :-
Dimethylformamide 154 96 100 0.2
Dimethylsulfoxide 189 95 100 0.1
Dioxane 101 92 100 0.6

FEP Chemical Resistance Char

Solvent Exposure Temperature, C Exposure Time Weight Gain,%
Acetone 20 12 mo 0.3
50 12 mo 0.4
70 2 wk 0
Benzene 78 96 hr 0.5
100 8 hr 0.6
200 8 hr 1.0
Carbon Tetrachloride 25 12 mo 0.6
50 12 mo 1.6
70 2 wk 1.9
100 8 hr 2.5
200 8 hr 3.7
Ethanol (95%) 25 12 mo 0
50 12 mo 0
70 2 wk 0
100 8 hr 0.1
200 8 hr 0.3
Ethyl Acetate 25 12 mo 0.5
50 12 mo 0.7
70 2 wk 0.7
Toluene 25 12 mo 0.3
50 12 mo 0.6
70 2 wk 0.6

Reagent Concentration Exposure Temperature, C Exposure Time Weight Gain,%
Hydrochloric Acid 10% 25 12 mo 0
10% 50 12 mo 0
10% 70 12 mo 0
20% 100 8 hr 0
20% 200 8 hr 0
Nitric Acid 10% 25 12 mo 0
10% 70 12 mo 0.1
Sulfuric Acid 30% 25 12 mo 0
30% 70 12 mo 0
30% 100 8 hr 0
30% 200 8 hr 0.1
Sodium Hydroxide 10% 25 12 mo 0
10% 70 12 mo 0.1
50% 100 8 hr 0
50% 200 8 hr 0
Ammonium Hydroxide 10% 25 12 mo 1
10% 70 12 mo 0.1

Chemical Effect on Polymer Sample
Chloroform Wets, Insoluble at boiling Point
Ethylene Bromide 0.3% weight gain after 24 hr at 100 C
Fluorinated Hydrocarbons Wets, swelling occurs in boiling solvent
Fluoro-naphthalene Insoluble at boiling point, some swelling
Fluoronitrobezene Insoluble at boiling point, some swelling
Pentachlorobenzamide Insoluble
Perfluoroxylene Insoluble at boiling point, slight swelling
Tetrabromoethane Insoluble at boiling point
Tetrachlorothylene Wets, some swelling after 2 hr at 120 C
Trichloroacetic Acid Insoluble at boiling point
Trichloroethylene Insoluble at boiling point after 1HR

Chemical Effect on Polymer Sample
Abietic Acid Insoluble at boiling point
Acetic Acid Wets
Acetophenone Insoluble -0.2% weight gain after 24 hr at 150 C
Acrylic Anhydride No effect at room temperature
Allyl Acetate No effect at room temperature
Allyl Methacrylate No effect at room temperature
Aluminium Chloride Insoluble in solution with NaCL; 1%-5% anhydrous ALCL3 affects mechanical properties
Ammonium Chloride Insoluble at boiling point
Aniline Insoluble-0.3% weight gain after 24 hr at 150 C
Borax No wetting or effect by 5% solution
Boric Acid Insoluble at boiling point
Butyl Acetate Insoluble at boiling point
Butyl Methacrylate No effect at room temperature
Calcium Chloride No effect by saturated solution in methanol
Carbon Disulfide Insoluble at boiling point
Cetane Wets, insoluble at boiling point
Chromic Acid Insoluble at boiling point
Cyclohexanone No effect observed

Chemical Effect on Polymer Sample
Dibutyl Phthalate Wets, no effect at 250 C
Diethyl Carbonate No effect at the room temperature
Dimethyl Ether No effect observed
Dimethyl Formamide No effect observed
Ethyl Ether Wets,no effect at 250 C
Ethylene Glycol Insoluble at boiling point
Ferric Chloride 1%-5%FeCL3.6H2O reduces mechanical properties
Ferric Phosphate No effect by 5% solution
Formaldehyde Insoluble at boiling point after 2 hr
Forme Acid Insoluble at boiling point
Hexane Wets
Hydrogen Fluoride Wets, no effect 100% HF at the room temperature
Lead No effect
Magnesium Chloride Insoluble at boiling point
Mercury Insoluble at boiling point
Methacrylic Acid No effect at the room temperature
Methanol Wets
Methyl Methacrylate Wets above melting point
Naphthalene No effect
Nitrobenzene No effect
2-Nitro-Butanol No effect
Nitromethane No effect
2-Nitro-2-Methyl Propanol No effect
n-Octadecyl Alcohol Wets
Phenol Insoluble at boiling point
Phthalic Acid Wets
Pinene Wets, Insoluble at boiling point
Piperidene No effect 0.3%-0.5%weight gain after 24 hr at 106 C
Polyacrylonitrile No effect
Potassium Acetate Insoluble at boiling point
Pyridine No effect
Stannous Chloride No effect at Melting point (246C)
Sulfur No effect at 445 C
Triethanolamine Wets, no effect
Vinyl Methacrylate No effect at the room temperature
Water Insoluble at boiling point
Xylene 0.4%weight gain after 48 hr at 137 C
Zinc Chloride No effect at Melting point (260 C)

 

 

Flange and Pipe Dimensions

Flange and Pipe Dimensions

Note: *ID As Per Seamless Carbon Steel Pipe OD

OD T
SIZE OUT SIDE DIAMETER FLANGE THICKNESS
NB ASA
150#
DIN BSD BSE BSF IS
6392
ASA
150#
DIN BSD BSE BSF IS
6392
25 107.9 115.0 114.0 114.0 121.0 100.0 14.3 16.0 11.0 11.0 10.0 14.0
32 117.3 15.7
40 127.0 150.0 133.0 133.0 140.0 130.0 17.5 16.0 13.0 13.0 13.0 16.0
50 152.4 165.0 152.0 152.0 165.0 140.0 19.0 18.0 14.0 14.0 16.0 16.0
65 177.8 - - - - - 22.4 - - - - -
80 190.5 200.0 184.0 184.0 203.0 190.0 23.8 20.0 16.0 16.0 16.0 18.0
100 228.6 220.0 216.0 216.0 229.0 210.0 23.8 20.0 19.0 19.0 19.0 18.0
150 279.4 285.0 279.0 279.0 305.0 265.0 25.4 22.0 19.0 19.0 22.0 20.0
200 342.9 340.0 337.0 337.0 368.0 320.0 28.6 24.0 22.0 22.0 25.0 22.0
250 406.4 395.0 406.0 406.0 432.0 375.0 30.2 26.0 27.0 27.0 25.0 24.0
300 482.6 445.0 457.0 457.0 489.0 440.0 31.7 26.0 28.5 28.5 29.0 24.0
P.C.D. NH X HØ SCH-40
SIZE P.C.D. NO. OF HOLE & DIA PIPE
NB ASA
150#
DIN BSD BSE BSF IS
6392
ASA
150#
DIN BSD BSE BSF IS
6392
OD ID
25 79.4 85.0 83.0 83.0 87.0 75.0 4x15.9 4X14 4x14 4x14 4x18 4x11 33.4 26.6
32 88.9 4x15.9 42.2
40 98.4 110.0 98.0 98.0 105.0 100.0 4x15.9 4X18 4x14 4x14 4x18 4x14 48.3 40.9
50 120.6 125.0 114.0 114.0 127.0 110.0 4X19.1 4X18 4x18 4x18 4x18 4x14 60.3 52.5
65 139.7 - - - - - 4X19.1 - - - - - 73.0 62.6
80 152.4 160.0 146.0 146.0 165.0 150.0 4X19.1 8X18 4x18 4x18 8x18 4x18 88.9 77.9
100 190.5 180.0 178.0 178.0 191.0 170.0 8X19.1 8X18 4x18 4x18 8x18 4x18 114.3 102.3
150 241.3 240.0 235.0 235.0 260.0 225.0 8X22.2 8X22 8x18 8x18 12x22 8x18 168.3 154.1
200 298.5 295.0 292.0 292.0 324.0 280.0 8X22.2 8X22 8x18 8x22 12x22 8x18 219.1 202.7
250 361.9 350.0 356.0 356.0 381.0 335.0 12X25.4 12X22 8x22 12x22 12x25 12x18 273.0 254.4
300 431.8 400.0 406.0 406.0 438.0 395.0 12X25.4 12X22 12x22 12x25 16x25 12x22 323.8 303.2

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